Skip to main content

tv   [untitled]    March 2, 2012 12:30pm-1:00pm PST

12:30 pm
and they knew the value men -- the value of education. there were able to buy their homes and support their families. another woman in my life who demonstrates unshakeable persistence and unflinching sacrifice is my mother who is sitting over there with my son. [applause] she kept her eyes on the prize that is education. as well -- and was well aware of education and its importance for the future of black america. my mom was educated from kindergarten through eighth grade in washington, d.c.. which is recognized as the mother church of all black catholics. washington, d.c. was south of the transfer -- the mason decisiodixon line.
12:31 pm
st. augustine was established in the late 1850's during the separate but equal and in most cases on equal time. this school was started by the first order of black roman catholic nuns, the oblate sisters of providence out of baltimore, maryland. their purpose was to educate black children. these nuns persistence and unflinching sacrifice influence my mother's life and my life. my mother was in high school when the march on washington occurred. the weeks leading up to the march, my mother participated in many peaceful demonstrations and picket lines in front of the white house. again, this is another example of unshakable persistence and sacrifice. she did this being afraid and not reacting when the white agitators were spitting on her and her girlfriend. it was important for her to
12:32 pm
peacefully continue in her fight for justice and civil rights. i mother was the first to obtain a college degree and went on to an education in education that lasted for decades. my work ethic was derived from her. when you are the daughter of a teacher and administrator i had a front row seat to watching a woman at work in the classroom. most of all, i would -- i truly mean this and the gravity of this hit me last week when i was before commission -- rules committee. i'm humbled and thankful for the many african-american women here who have paved the way for me, naomi kelly. supervisor kennedy who is here in the audience with us. supervisor doris war. attorney-general harris. judge terry jackson.
12:33 pm
amelia ward. i am thankful to this woman who embraced me when i started my professional career in san francisco. glendower richardson, carol tatum, and so many of you are here in this audience and i am grateful for my contemporaries who are my sisters and rock. from supervisor malia cohen, karen roy, and lindon. i have found my place here and i have mentioned, i began my career here in 1996 with mayer brown. i realized then in my 20's that i needed to pursue higher education. and it helped the mayor said he would never give me a raise or promotion on till i went back to school. i enrolled in the university of san francisco law school. i got my j.d. and pass the bar.
12:34 pm
-- passed the gar. -- bar. [applause] san francisco has been my home. six years ago i was married here on the steps almost six years ago to this month. [applause] some are clapping, some are not. [laughter] it has been a fundamental time for my family and i having been nominated. by mayor ed lee and i am grateful to that community and i am grateful to the mayor and the board of supervisors who are considering this nomination. i vow to do the best job i possibly can for the city and i have -- as i have done from the outset of my city career. i will continue to draw inspiration and guidance from the black woman in our history
12:35 pm
and culture who have paved the way for me and others with their relentless fight against prejudice and intolerance and hate. there consummate energy, intelligence, and courage and their unshakeable persistence, unflinching sacrifice and unwavering faith. i have angels on my shoulder and they're my sisters. thank you and i wish you a happy and joyful black history celebration. [applause] thank you. >> thank you for those profound words. now, for all of you whose names were mentioned by naomi in her remarks, we split up the list so she covered half the room. i am not going to announce it.
12:36 pm
there are a few other people. mohamad in the public works department, rhonda simmons, give them all around of applause as well. at this time we have a special presentation. for naomi. bill hoskins. [applause] >> did afternoon. >> this is a treat to be able to present this to our keynote speaker. and on behalf of the african american historical and cultural society and the board, i was sitting there enjoying your
12:37 pm
presentation. also thinking that there could not be a better match for today's title of which we all know. i wanted to , when al williams was describing and introducing attorney naille kellie -- naomi kelly, he mentioned she had made and still is and will in the future make valuable contributions that will -- we will all benefit from. he suggested she should be honored and was picked to be the keynote speaker not because she is a woman or because she is african-american. not because she is incredibly capable but they left out two things. she is young and she is
12:38 pm
beautiful. so again on behalf of the african american historical and cultural society and board, it is a pleasure to present this to you. >> thank you. [applause] >> ok, with that -- we have judge monica riley. and a number of commissioners. please stand. thank you for being here. we will now have a musical presentation by the amira project. [applause]
12:39 pm
>> the afternoon, everyone. can you hear me? now you can hear me? all right. i will make my interjections brief. you have been hearing for july afternoon and we're going to do some is secure. that is voice of freedom. we celebrate the roots aof faith and freedom. spirituals are the root of most african american history. and music. it is important to know where the spirituals come from. the music came from africa. there are slave testimonies to the fact that music came from africa. and so that is the root of african-american music which is renowned around the world.
12:40 pm
the other thing that happened is that in the u.s. especially, we lost the ability to use the drum. we did not lose the ability to use rhythm. the -- which is the most direct link to africa, we use the staff and hand clapping. we are going to do a song that will become familiar to me -- to you in a moment. it was put together by our musical director who is holding the staff. and our soloists will be carolyn and nedra. when i ask you to join in, i want you to help us out. all right? thank you very much. [applause]
12:41 pm
[singing]
12:42 pm
[drums and singing] ♪ in the water
12:43 pm
12:44 pm
♪ [applause]
12:45 pm
[singing]
12:46 pm
12:47 pm
12:48 pm
[singing] [applause] >> the project. [applause]
12:49 pm
let's give them another round. ok. that brings us to the acknowledgements and closing remarks. on behalf of the san francisco african-american historical society, i would -- something like this cannot happen without the involvement of a lot of people. and some of those people on the back of your programs, we have listed all the members of the committee who worked hard and long to make this happen. nobody worked as hard as kirsten in the mayor's office out of the office of may -- neighborhood services. let's give kirsten and the committee a big round of applause for their contributions to this great effort. we have another -- a number of proclamations that was received from senator feinstein and boxer and other offices. a couple of other people we do have with you. michael sweet is with us and
12:50 pm
sheriff ross mirkarimi is with us. let's give them around of applause. hansothis is a membership organization. open to any -- anyone. ms. kelly spoke to in her remarks. you wrote him to join us. there is information about the society and refreshments. please join us in the light court. thank you for making this a wonderful kick off. let's give naomi kelly a round of applause again. thank you. [applause] thank you all very much. ♪
12:51 pm
charles bennett's high school dream was to teach in the old neighborhood. but without the money for college, all he got was the old neighborhood. support the united negro college fund. a mind is a terrible thing to waste. >> the right to vote allows us to vote for candidates or party and it is a significant way to have our voice heard. exactly 100 years ago, women were given the vote in california. the battle for women's suffrage
12:52 pm
was not an easy one. it took more than 70 years. a woman could run for president in new york. >> organizing this conference, basically it modeled itself on a declaration of independence for women. it marked the beginning of the women's equality movement in the united states. >> at that time, women were banned from holding property and voting in elections. >> susan b. anthony dedicated her life to reform.
12:53 pm
>> suffrage in the middle of the 19th century accomplished one goal, it was diametrically opposed to this idea. >> many feared it would be corrupted by politics. >> women in the 19th century had to convince male voters that having the vote would not change anything. that woman would still be devoted to the home, the family, that they would remain pure and innocent, that having the vote would not corrupt them. >> support gradually grew in state and local campaigns. >> leaders like ellen clark sgt
12:54 pm
come repeatedly stopping these meetings -- , repeatedly stopping these meetings as a politically active figure. doing everything they could to ground the campaign in domesticity. >> despite their efforts, the link made it tough whenever voters were in the big city. a specialist in francisco. >> the problem with san francisco is that women's suffrage as an idea was associated. >> susan b. anthony joined the provision party. a deadly idea in san francisco. liquor was the foundation of the
12:55 pm
economy. and >> anything that touched on the possibility of prohibition was greatly and popular. >> the first campaign was a great effort, but not a success. >> the war was not over. less than one decade later, a graphic protests brought new life to the movement. >> women's suffrage, the republican convention in oakland, this time it was the private sector response. 300 marched down the streets of the convention center. women were entitled to be here.
12:56 pm
>> joining together for another campaign. >> women opened a club in san francisco. it was called the votes for women club. if she could get the shopkeepers to have lunch, she could get them to be heard literature. the lunch room was a tremendous success. >> it was the way that people thought about women willing to fight for a successful campaign. what happened was, the social transformation increase the boundary of what was possible, out word. >> there were parades and
12:57 pm
rallies, door to door candidacies, reaching every voter in the state. >> the eyes of the nation were on california in 1911, when we all voted. it was the sixth and largest state in the nation to approve this. one decade later, we have full voting rights in the united states. helping newly enfranchised women, a new political movement was founded. >> starting in the 1920's, it was a movement created by the suffragettes moving forward to getting the right to vote. all of the suffragettes were interested in educating the new voters. >> non-partisan, not endorsing
12:58 pm
candidates >> -- endorsing candidates, getting the right to vote and one they have their voice heard. >> the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage is taking place throughout the state. bancroft library is having an exhibit that highlights the women's suffrage movement, chronicling what happened in california, bringing women the right to vote. >> how long does this mean going on? >> the week of the 20th. people do not realize that women were allowed to vote as early as the 1920's. in the library collection we have a manuscript from the end
12:59 pm
of december, possibly longer. >> in commemoration of 100 years of voting in california. 100 years ago this year, we won the right to vote. around 1911, this is how it would have addressed. and here we are, dressed the same. [chanting] [chanting]
left
right